I have taught a number of ancient language and history classes (see below) in the USA and Australia, both alone (Instructor of Record) and as a teaching assistant. I'm also very interested in professional development initiatives for teachers both within and outside my field, as I currently co-organize pedagogy workshops for my colleagues in the Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (Department of Classics). I have also participated in pedagogical training at Columbia's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) as a Lead Teaching Fellow  (LTF) for 2016-17, and now as a Senior Lead Teaching Fellow  (SLTF) for 2017-18 I have been developing a learning community on inclusive assessment methods with one of my fellow SLTF's (Luciana de Souza Leão in Sociology), as well as mentoring current LTFs.  As a fellow in the Teaching Scholars Program at Columbia for 2016-17, I also had the opportunity to design (ex nihilo) and teach my own research-based advanced ancient history seminar for undergraduates, entitled Youth in Ancient RomeThe course not only allowed me to road-test my research on an incredibly bright group of undergraduates, but it allowed me to teach at an advanced level and add further techniques to my pedagogical repertoire. As a strong believer in undergraduate research as having real pedagogical benefits, my students had to complete a major research project, and this also involved supervising these projects through various stages: conception, research methods, drafting and workshop presentation skills, and then, the final product.

More generally, my pedagogy encompasses a wide range of approaches aimed at promoting primary source-based, active and inclusive student learning, encompassing artefact studies, digital resources and (web based) assessments, role-playing, and on-site oral presentations. Part of this approach explicitly draws on and integrates material culture into both my ancient language and history classes wherever possible to facilitate more direct connections with ancient Greece and Rome. To take one example, wherever possible, I make a point of bringing less studied, documentary texts into my classes, such as graffiti, coins, and inscriptions, particularly from Columbia's Olcott Collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML) at Butler Library or further afield, using the Greek and Roman collections at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Besides offering students a portal to the ancient world and thus engaging them more directly with the content they are learning, I do this with several aims in mind: to create a dialogue between the literary and documentary; to encourage questions about the development of the Classical cannon and social history issues, such as literacies, demography, status-based and gendered relationships; to impart basic epigraphical skills and a familiarity with the materiality of language; to highlight linguistic points of change and more besides.

In general, I strive to equip my students with transferrable, critical skills, such as source analysis, that will serve them both in and outside of the Classical classroom.

Students in my Intensive Elementary Latin class (summer 2015), using the Latin inscriptions from the Olcott collection, Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML). Students each chose two inscriptions and conducted an autopsy of their inscription, working up a rough edition and then translating their text. Besides providing fairly simple texts to read and a further introduction to Latin epigraphy, the session also presented an opportunity to discuss Roman social life and how these inscriptions commemorated not only the dead, but advertised complex social relationships and dependencies, such as slaves commemorating their fellow slaves (“conservi”), a father commemorating his foster-son (“alumnus”), or some students (“discentes”) commemorating their teacher.

Students in my Intensive Elementary Latin class (summer 2015), using the Latin inscriptions from the Olcott collection, Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML). Students each chose two inscriptions and conducted an autopsy of their inscription, working up a rough edition and then translating their text. Besides providing fairly simple texts to read and a further introduction to Latin epigraphy, the session also presented an opportunity to discuss Roman social life and how these inscriptions commemorated not only the dead, but advertised complex social relationships and dependencies, such as slaves commemorating their fellow slaves (“conservi”), a father commemorating his foster-son (“alumnus”), or some students (“discentes”) commemorating their teacher.

My teaching portfolio, including teaching philosophy, syllabi, faculty references and student evaluations, is available upon request.


Teaching Experience 

Columbia University

Instructor of Record

  • Youth in Ancient Rome (HIST UN3050). Advanced ancient history seminar in translation, designed and taught as a Teaching Scholar. Fall 2016. (Class cohort included post-baccalaureate certificate students).
  • Intermediate Latin II (LATN 1202): Sallust (Bellum Catilinae) and Ovid (Ars Amatoria 3). Fall 2015.
  • Intensive Elementary Latin (LATN S1121): 6 week accelerated version of the year-long progression of Elementary Latin I-II. Summer 2015. (Class cohort included Ph.D. students).
  • Intermediate Latin I (LATN 1201): Catullus and Cicero (Pro Caelio). Fall 2014.  (Class cohort included Ph.D. students).                  

Teaching Assistant

  • Worlds of Alexander the Great (CLCV UN3059), under Prof. John T. Ma. Spring 2017.
  • The Romans and their Empire, 754BCE - 562CE (HIST W1020), under Prof. W.V. Harris. Spring 2016, -15, -14.
  • Intermediate Latin I (LATN 1201): Catullus and Cicero (Pro Caelio), under Prof. Carmela V. Franklin. Fall 2013.

Guest Lecturer

  • “The Roman reception of Alexander’s image.” (for CLCV UN3059). Spring 2017 .
  • “The career and regime of Augustus.” (for HIST W1020). Spring 2015.
  • “The social and cultural history of old age in the Roman empire.” (for HIST W3026, Roman Social History, under Prof. W.V. Harris). Fall 2014.

Macquarie University / Open Universities Australia

Course Tutor and Online Convener

  • The Fall of the Roman Republic (HIST 130). Tutor, convener, and grader, with lectures pre-recorded by Prof. T.W. Hillard. Summer 2011-12.

Professional Development

Service

  • Co-organizer (with Y. Claros), Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC), Department of Classics, Columbia University, 2017-18. Monthly pedagogical development workshop series run by and for graduate students teaching in various aspects of the ancient world.

Workshops and Talks

  • “Inclusive Teaching and Diversity in the Classical Classroom.” at Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC), Department of Classics, Columbia University; November 14, 2017.
  • "Role-playing with Reacting to the Past: Athens Besieged 405-404 BCE Game Sampler" at the Innovative Teaching Summer Institute, by invitation of the Center for Teaching and Learning, Columbia University, June 14, 2017.
  • “Role-playing in the Classical Classroom: From Richlin (2013) to Reacting to the Past.” at Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC), Department of Classics, Columbia University, April 25, 2017.
  • “Undergraduate Research as Pedagogical Tool.” at Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC), Department of Classics, Columbia University, November 22, 2016.
  • “Pedagogical Strategies for Teaching Post-Traditional Language Students.” at Team Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC), Department of Classics, Columbia University, October 13, 2015.

Fellowships

  • Senior Lead Teaching Fellow (SLTF), Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University, 2017-18.
  • Teaching Scholar, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University, 2016-17.
  • Lead Teaching Fellow (LTF), Center for Learning and Teaching (CTL), Columbia University, 2016-17.
  • Undergraduate Research Scholar, Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC), under Professor Angela Brew (Macquarie University / University of Sydney), 2009-10.

Related Publications

(2012), [as an undergraduate] with Brew, A., "Enhancing quality learning through experiences of research-based learning: Implications for academic development",  International Journal for Academic Development 17(1): 47-58.